Chapter XIV – Kara Tepe – Lesvos

I was in France, working on the first part of the documentary, editing recording voice over, translating interview etc… I was also planning the second part, looking at the different place I would go and how to get there when Fred from HSA called me.

He asked me to come back here in Kara Tepe, Lesvos to continue the documentation and video work I started there by winter 2015. 
As soon as possible I booked a flight and leave for the island.

Somehow I knew that the things were different there now that the EU-Turkish deal was in place, but I didn’t expect the things to be so drastically changed. I arrived on Lesvos few days after the Fred call and met him and David at the Mytilini airport. They drove me straight to the camp to show me how it has evolved over the last few months. First, the place looked the same to me, I even met some good friend I made across the volunteers of the camp last winter like Sara who was still working there, but soon I realized how much everything has changed: new infrastructures, new offices, sanitary area etc … The camp was now turned into something new: a long-term humanity base. And as the people couldn’t move further anymore due to the deal, they were staying and living here.

First I felt strange experiencing this kind of “neighborhood atmosphere”, Kara Tepe was really feeling even like a Holliday camp kind of … Everyone was smiling, the kids were running and playing all over the place… Cinema screening and activities such as football and kindergarten were happening every day … You could not feel the stress and the pressure that we were experiencing last winter when the boats were still arriving every day. And it was strange not to feel this tension, not to expect the phone to ring at any moment to warn you that a boat was arriving. To not be in “emergency mode” was disturbing as you would feel everything was alright but though, the work was still crucial and of course, to not have boat arrivals didn’t mean we had nothing to do …

Between school, food distribution, close distribution, sorting and storing donations etc … Many things were still needed. We weren’t facing an emergency humanitarian crisis anymore but were running a long-term support for the thousand people stacked there.
Of course they couldn’t move, but still, they needed a place to live by the time they’re waiting. And our work was to make the life less difficult for everyone and to sustainably make them passing through the process of getting the asylum. So we were working every day … Little by little … Slowly but surely we were sustaining the effort.

Our tasks were basically the same than the last winter but they were taking a different form. The food distribution was for example driven by Sara. She was one of the most devoted person I ever met and she was doing everything she could for the people of the camp. Then she had the idea to change the process of the food distribution, and to make it easier for the refugees, she organized a daily door to door food distribution service.
And it was way better than just delivering the meal in front of a queue of starving people, it was way more exhausting of course, as we were carrying heavy food boxes all over the camp, but at the end, everyone was happier this way. We were getting to know our people better, they were glad we were going to them. And I think this was one of the things that was making the difference between our group and the other NGO in place.
We were going to them.

Also, the clothes distribution was not a mess anymore as we were delivering the goods based on a appointments schedule so that we would focus on fewer people every day but we would be able to respond to their needs more efficiently. One of my other task in the camp was to take over the French lessons in the school HSA was running. Indeed, African people were among the refugees and were also asking for education. Then I met their kids and started to teach them every day trying to cover the whole spectrum of the basic education. It’s weird to realize how useful your knowledge can be as little as it is.
I never expected to be a teacher but I discovered myself a new utility that could make a change in these people lives. And it’s funny to think that you could never be a teacher in France without at least a master or something similar while here, the little you know makes you running classes of writing, mathematics, geography etc …

And I was also driving unofficial French lessons for Arabic speakers, working hard to make it through Arabic, English and French. 

And for an entire month, while working hard to make the life in the camp sustainable, I discovered how the crisis changed and how the EU-Turkish deal had an impact on people life. I realized the difference between helping in an emergency situation and a long-term humanitarian support which is completely different but as important and crucial.

For an entire month, I realized we were not only helping the “refugees”: we were living with them. They were part of our lives, part of the people we were seeing all day long. They were friends. And it was tricky to keep the distinction clear as you were willing to spend some time with them, just enjoying spending good moments and to get closer to them … but you also had to keep in mind that you couldn’t get too close … you had to keep a gap and to stay neutral. They were still “refugees” and you were still “humanitarian volunteer” and that meant you had responsibilities towards them. 

This was a pain and a difficult thing to do. We were so close to them, doing so many things together, drawing, swimming, singing, gardening, learning, joking … well, basically all the good things you’re doing in the life with the people you love BUT you were not allowed to see them as your friends as for the NGO’s they were first “people in need” that we were helping.

I’d say that this situation made me question myself on how important was the human relation through a crisis like this. I asked myself if it was possible to help people with humanity. To help “your friends” passing through a critical situation and to be fair enough to be equal with everyone. 

I think it’s one of the most tricky things in the humanitarian work.

Chapitre XIV – Kara Tepe – Lesbos

J’étais en France, travaillant sur la première partie du documentaire (montage, voix-off, traduction etc …) tout en planifiant la deuxième partie du parcours (de ce projet qui maintenant était devenu bien plus que son but initial), regardant les différents endroits où j’irais etc . lorsque je reçu l’appel de Fred, de HSA me demandant de revenir ici à Kara Tepe, Lesbos pour continuer la documentation et le travail vidéo que j’avais commencé par l’hiver 2015.
Aussitôt que possible, j’ai réservé un vol et parti pour l’île.
D’une certaine manière, je savais que les choses étaient différentes là-bas maintenant que l’accord UE-Turquie était en place, mais je ne m’attendais pas à ce qu’elles le soient si drastiquement. Je suis arrivé à Lesbos quelques jours après l’appel de Fred; lui et David son venue me chercher à l’aéroport de Mytilini. Ils m’ont conduit directement au camp pour me montrer comment il avait évolué au cours des derniers mois. Tout d’abord, l’endroit m’a semblé le même, j’ai même rencontré de bons amis qui étaient déjà présents l’hiver dernier comme Sara, Shareen etc . mais bientôt j’ai compris combien tout avait changé: nouvelles infrastructures, nouveaux bureaux, nouvelles zones sanitaires, etc. …. Le camp avait été transformé en quelque chose de nouveau: une base humanitaire à long terme. Et comme les gens ne pouvaient plus bouger davantage en raison du nouveau deal, ils restaient et vivaient ici.


D’abord, je trouvais étonnante, cette sorte d’atmosphère de quartier; Kara Tepe faisait même penser (à première vue) a un genre de centre de vacances … Tout le monde était souriant, les enfants couraient et jouaient partout … Cinéma en plein air et activités telles que le football et la maternelle se produisaient chaque jour … Vous ne pouviez pas ressentir le stress et la pression que nous éprouvions l’hiver dernier lorsque les bateaux arrivaient tous les jours. Et c’était étrange de ne pas ressentir cette tension, de ne pas s’attendre à ce que le téléphone sonne à tout moment pour vous avertir qu’un bateau arrivait. Ne pas être en «mode d’urgence» était dérangeant car c’était comme si tout allait bien alors que le travail était encore crucial et, bien sûr, ne pas avoir d’arrivées de bateaux ne signifiait pas que nous n’avions rien à faire …
Entre l’école, la distribution rapprochée des aliments, le tri et le stockage des dons, etc. Beaucoup de choses étaient encore nécessaires. Nous n’Etions plus confrontés à une crise humanitaire d’urgence, mais nous soutenions à long terme les milliers de personnes qui étaient bloqués, cloitres dans le camp.
Bien sûr, ils ne pouvaient pas bouger, mais ils avaient toujours besoin d’un endroit pour vivre le temps d’obtenir leur statut de demandeur d’asile. Et notre travail était de rendre la vie moins difficile pour tout le monde et de les faire passer durablement et surement dans le processus d’obtention de l’asile. Nous travaillions tous les jours … petit à petit … Lentement, mais sûrement, nous soutenions l’effort.
Nos tâches étaient fondamentalement les mêmes que le dernier hiver, mais elles adoptaient une forme différente. La distribution alimentaire été conduite par Sara (l’une des personnes les plus dévouées que j’ai pu rencontrer le long de la route) et elle faisait tout ce qu’elle pouvait (littéralement, elle venait de donner un an de sa vie) pour les gens du camp. Pour eux, elle avait eu l’idée de changer le processus de distribution des aliments, et pour faciliter leurs vies, elle avait organisé un service quotidien de distribution de nourriture de porte à porte.
Et c’était bien mieux que de livrer le repas devant une file d’attente de personnes affamées; bien plus épuisant, bien sûr, car nous transportions de lourdes boîtes alimentaires partout dans le camp, mais à la fin, tout le monde était plus heureux de cette façon. Nous connaissions mieux les gens, ils étaient heureux. Et je pense que c’était l’une des choses qui faisaient la différence entre notre groupe et les autres ONG’s en place.
Nous allions à eux.
We were going to them.


En outre, la distribution des vêtements n’était plus le bordel que nous avions connu puisque nous livrions les marchandises en fonction d’un calendrier des rendez-vous afin de se concentrer sur moins de personnes chaque jour, mais d’être en mesure de répondre plus efficacement à leurs besoins.
Une de mes autres tâches dans le camp était de me charger des leçons de français dans l’école d’HSA. En effet, des Africains (Cameroun, Centrafrique, RDC) étaient parmi les réfugiés et demandaient également des études. J’ai rencontré leurs enfants et commencé à leur apprendre chaque jour à essayer de couvrir tout le spectre de l’éducation de base. C’est étrange de se rendre compte de l’utilité de votre connaissance (aussi mediocre soit-elle).
Je ne m’étais encore jamais attendu à être un enseignant, mais je me suis decouvert une nouvelle utilité qui pouvait changer, à son échelle, le mode de vie de ces personnes. C’est amusant de penser que jamais je n’aurais pu être professeur en France sans au moins un MASTER ou quelque chose de semblable, alors que le peu que je connaissais ici, me faisait mener des cours d’écriture, de mathématiques, de géographie, etc.
Et je donnais également des leçons de français hors classe pour les arabophones, travaillant dur pour faire ma soupe entre l’Arabe, l’Anglais et le Français.
Pendant plus d’un mois, tout en travaillant dur pour rendre la vie dans le camp meilleure et durable, j’ai découvert comment la crise avait changé et comment l’accord UE-Turquie avait impacté sur la vie des gens. Je me suis rendu compte de la différence entre aider dans une situation d’urgence et supporter un travail humanitaire à long terme: deux choses complètement différentes, mais aussi importante et cruciale.

Pendant un mois entier, j’ai compris qu’il n’était plus seulement question d’aider les «réfugiés»: nous vivions avec eux. Ils faisaient partie de nos vies, une partie des gens que nous voyions toute la journée. C’étaient nos amis et, il était délicat de garder une distinction claire car vous étiez disposé à passer du temps avec eux, tout simplement en profitant de bons moments, à vous rapprocher d’eux … mais vous deviez garder à l’esprit que vous ne pouviez pas être trop proche … garder un ” espace ” et rester neutre. Ils étaient encore «réfugiés» et vous étiez toujours «volontaire humanitaire» et cela signifiait que vous aviez des responsabilités à leur égard.

C’était douloureux parfois et souvent, une chose difficile à faire. Nous étions tellement proches d’eux, faisions tant de choses ensemble, dessiner, nager, chanter, jardiner, apprendre, blaguer … bref, toutes les bonnes choses qu’on fait dans la vie avec les gens qu’on aime, a la différence qu’ici, vous n’étiez pas autorisé à les considérer- comme vos amis: pour les ONG, ils étaient d’abord des «personnes dans le besoin» que nous devions aider.

Je dirais que cette situation m’a permis de me questionner sur l’importance de la relation humaine lors d’une crise comme celle-ci. Ça m’a fait me demander s’il était possible d’aider les gens avec humanité sans perdre notre efficacité. Pour aider «vos amis» à traverser une situation critique, d’être juste et équitable à tous. Peut-on aider une personne qu’on aime comme on aide le dernier des connards?

Je pense que c’est l’une des choses les plus difficiles dans le travail humanitaire.